Overall | Doctor Who-An Unearthly Child (1963) | Doctor Who-The Daleks (1963) | Doctor Who-The Edge of Destruction (1964)

Doctor Who-The Beginning (Box Set) (1963)

Doctor Who-The Beginning (Box Set) (1963)

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Released 2-Mar-2006

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Overall Package

    It's hardly surprising that Dr. Who has become the mammoth cultural phenomenon that it is. Even at the very beginning, all the elements are in place: inventive storylines, exciting cliffhangers, unexplained mysteries, and cheap but charming filmmaking. Throw in an irascible time-traveller, the mind-bending TARDIS, and top it all off with perhaps the most memorable theme song produced for television, and you have the makings of a classic.

    Doctor Who - The Beginning includes the first three serials ever produced and a reconstruction of the lost fourth serial. This release is an absolute must have for historical value alone. The restoration team have done their usual fine job and transferred the serials very well. It's the extras though that truly seal the deal. This is a case of high quality all the way with informative documentaries on every aspect of the series' early development. And to top it all off, there are Daleks! Enjoy.

Ratings (out of 5)

Video
Audio
Extras
Plot
Overall

© Adam Atkinson (read my bio)
Friday, May 05, 2006
Other Reviews
The DVD Bits - Richard G

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Rating - John Prentice REPLY POSTED

Overall | Doctor Who-An Unearthly Child (1963) | Doctor Who-The Daleks (1963) | Doctor Who-The Edge of Destruction (1964)

Doctor Who-An Unearthly Child (1963)

Doctor Who-An Unearthly Child (1963)

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Released 2-Mar-2006

Cover Art

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Details At A Glance

General Extras
Category Science Fiction Main Menu Introduction
Main Menu Audio & Animation
Audio Commentary-Cast And Crew - Episodes 1 and 4
Bonus Episode-Pilot Episode Studio Recording, With Optional Commentary
Music Video-Theme Music Video
Featurette-Comedy Sketches
Gallery-Photo
Informational Subtitles
Rating Rated PG
Year Of Production 1963
Running Time 121:15 (Case: 183)
RSDL / Flipper Dual Layered Cast & Crew
Start Up Menu
Region Coding 2,4 Directed By Waris Hussein
Studio
Distributor

Roadshow Home Entertainment
Starring William Hartnell
Carole Ann Ford
William Russell
Jacqueline Hill
Case Amaray-Transparent-Secure Clip
RPI Box Music Ron Grainer


Video Audio
Pan & Scan/Full Frame Full Frame English Dolby Digital 2.0 (192Kb/s)
English Audio Commentary Dolby Digital 2.0 (192Kb/s)
Widescreen Aspect Ratio None
16x9 Enhancement No
Video Format 576i (PAL)
Original Aspect Ratio 1.33:1 Miscellaneous
Jacket Pictures No
Subtitles English for the Hearing Impaired
English Information
Smoking No
Annoying Product Placement No
Action In or After Credits No

NOTE: The Profanity Filter is ON. Turn it off here.

Plot Synopsis

    IAN: Just open the doors Dr. Foreman!

    DOCTOR: Heh? Doctor who? What's he talking about?

    

    Broadcast for the first time on 23 November 1963, An Unearthly Child marked the modest debut of our beloved Gallifreyan time-traveller at large, Dr Who. One can only imagine what viewers thought as they tuned in for the first time: Rorschach-like images clash and collide to a driving beat, an eerie melody chimes in (ooo-wee-ooh!) and the camera begins to weave its way through a dark English fog. A policeman paces around a junkyard; we pass by a creepy assortment of discarded objects, finally zooming in through the doors of an inauspicious police-box: the makings of a cultural icon.

    Susan Foreman (Carol Ann Ford) is a highly intelligent student who has her teachers concerned when her home address is revealed to be the junkyard in Totters Lane. Following her home one night, teachers Ian Chesterton and Barbara are shocked to discover an old man (William Hartnell) appears to have trapped Susan inside a police-box. Forcing their way inside they discover Susan in a room impossibly larger than the box's exterior dimensions. The old man turns out to be Susan's grandfather and a doctor of some kind and both claim to be time-travellers from far in the future. Ian and Barbara refuse to believe what they hear and are promptly whisked away by the Doctor in his ship, TARDIS, to pre-historical Earth where a tribal conflict over fire puts them in a spot of hot water . . .

    Face it: no self-respecting Dr Who will miss snapping up this release. The nostalgic and historical value for Who fans is simply too high to resist. Granted, the caveman plot is just a little slow, even dull at times (and director Waris Hussein had serious reservations about starting the series here); but the enigmatic character of the Doctor is captivating and raises the serial above its budget and story limitations. William Hartnell deserves more than just a little of the credit for getting Dr Who off the ground so successfully (although the appearance of his ultimate nemesis in the very next serial certainly helped to seal the deal). No one expected Dr Who to run for more than a few weeks, let alone still be on our screens some forty years later. An Unearthly Child, in all its cheap and quirky glory, remains something of a testament to the highly creative minds and determination of those behind Dr Who.

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Transfer Quality

Video

    Presented with the usual love and care that goes into a Dr Who, the video transfer is very good considering the limitations of the source material. An Unearthly Child is presented in its original full frame aspect ratio of 1.33:1.

    Sharpness and detail are somewhat limited, but actually far better than expected. The pilot episode particularly is softer than the serial, but generally the entire feature is a little soft on detail, although displaying some moments of strong clarity. Shadow detail is a little murky at times. Grain is present throughout and contributes to the softness of the image. It's not as bad as it sounds: the transfer is very watchable. Compared to some of the footage shown in the extras (on The Edge of Destruction), the difference is night and day. The image is clear: just don't consistently expect razor sharp video, especially in the fog scenes.

    An Unearthly Child was shot in black and white. Contrast and grey-scale are quite good, even given the limitations of its video source. Again, compared to footage in the extra features, the black and white footage has been vastly improved for the main feature.

    MPEG artefacts are mostly absent. The opening credits exhibit some relatively heavy macroblocking, but the rest of the feature shows only minor pixelization due to visible grain. I also noticed some moments of posterization at times. The TARDIS can show aliasing at times. Torch lights leave comet trails and mild microphony can be seen. There is also some unobtrusive vertical line damage. A few specks of dust are visible but the transfer is quite clean in general.

    Subtitles are excellent, as always, and presented in a readable, white font. Very few words are dropped from the titles. Also included are the usual informational subtitles.

Video Ratings Summary
Sharpness
Shadow Detail
Colour
Grain/Pixelization
Film-To-Video Artefacts
Film Artefacts
Overall

Audio

    Audio is presented in Dolby Digital 2.0 mono and is adequate and faithful to the source.

    Dialogue is clear and audible. Constant hiss is audible during the entire serial. The mono audio is naturally somewhat flat and undynamic, but perfectly acceptable. Audio sync is accurate.

    Ron Grainer and Delia Derbyshire put together the famous Dr Who theme. Norman Kay provided incidental music. The score is suitable to the action but entirely unmemorable.

    There is no surround or bass information.

Audio Ratings Summary
Dialogue
Audio Sync
Clicks/Pops/Dropouts
Surround Channel Use
Subwoofer
Overall

Extras

Main Menu Introduction

Main Menu Audio & Animation

Audio Commentary

    Not a bad effort at a group commentary and quite informative. Gary Russell asks questions of different cast members, holding the commentary together and giving it some order. Some of his questions are rather pointless though. "Are you proud of Dr Who?" style of questions don't really add much to the mix. Kudos, though, for using the question and answer format rather than just letting the participants watch and make aimless comments (as is usually the case on Dr Who commentaries). Producer Verity Lambert and actors Carole Ann Ford and William Russell appear on Episode 1. Director Waris Hussein joins Ford and William Russell on Episode 4.

Bonus Episode (35:38)

    The pilot episode was remade for broadcast with several changes, especially in the Doctor's and Susan's character. The Doctor was made less acerbic and Susan was made less aloof and a little more hysterical. The Pilot is an excellent addition and well worth watching. If Play All is selected, the Pilot (edited for broadcast) will play first. When selecting the Pilot from Extra Features, the studio recording plays unedited, including retakes. An audio commentary is also available, with Russell talking to Verity Lambert and Waris Hussein. The commentary is only available if the Pilot is selected from the Extra Features.

Music Video (2:36)

    Watch the opening credits in mono, Dolby Digital 2.0, and Dolby Digital 5.1. Kind of amusing, but mostly pointless.

Featurette

    Four very unfunny Dr Who themed sketches from 1999 featuring Little Britain's Matt Walliams. Pitch of Fear (3:44); Corridor Sketch (5:54); Web of Caves (3:50); The Kidnappers (3:38).

Gallery-Photo (6:03)

    Behind the scenes photographs with audio.

Informational Subtitles

    The usual informative subtitles. There's plenty of overlap with the documentaries from the discs in the box set.

R4 vs R1

NOTE: To view non-R4 releases, your equipment needs to be multi-zone compatible and usually also NTSC compatible.

    Both Region 1 and Region 2 releases are identical to ours outside of NTSC formatting for Region 1.

Summary

    The very beginnings of Dr Who. Need I say more?

    Video is very good when the limitations of the source are taken into account.

    Audio is adequate.

    The commentaries are good, but the remaining extras are uninteresting.

Ratings (out of 5)

Video
Audio
Extras
Plot
Overall

© Adam Atkinson (read my bio)
Tuesday, May 02, 2006
Review Equipment
DVDSony DVP-S336, using Component output
DisplayLG Flatron Widescreen RT-28FZ85RX. Calibrated with THX Optimizer. This display device is 16x9 capable.
Audio DecoderBuilt in to amplifier/receiver. Calibrated with THX Optimizer.
AmplificationYamaha RX-V357
SpeakersDB Dynamics Belmont Series: Fronts: B50F, Centre: B50C, Rears: B50S, Sub: SW8BR

Other Reviews NONE
Comments (Add)
Unfunny sketches?? -
Re: Unfunny sketches?? - Sean Brady

Overall | Doctor Who-An Unearthly Child (1963) | Doctor Who-The Daleks (1963) | Doctor Who-The Edge of Destruction (1964)

Doctor Who-The Daleks (1963)

Doctor Who-The Daleks (1963)

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Released 2-Mar-2006

Cover Art

This review is sponsored by
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Details At A Glance

General Extras
Category Science Fiction Main Menu Introduction
Menu Animation & Audio
Audio Commentary-Cast And Crew - Episodes 2, 4 And 7
Featurette-Creation Of The Daleks
Gallery-Photo
Informational Subtitles
Rating Rated PG
Year Of Production 1963
Running Time 171:42 (Case: 198)
RSDL / Flipper Dual Layered Cast & Crew
Start Up Menu
Region Coding 2,4 Directed By Christopher Barry
Richard Martin
Studio
Distributor

Roadshow Home Entertainment
Starring William Hartnell
Carole Ann Ford
William Russell
Jacqueline Hill
Case Amaray-Transparent-Secure Clip
RPI Box Music Tristram Cary


Video Audio
Pan & Scan/Full Frame Full Frame English Dolby Digital 2.0 (192Kb/s)
English Audio Commentary Dolby Digital 2.0 (192Kb/s)
Widescreen Aspect Ratio 1.29:1
16x9 Enhancement No
Video Format 576i (PAL)
Original Aspect Ratio 1.29:1 Miscellaneous
Jacket Pictures No
Subtitles English for the Hearing Impaired
English Information
Smoking No
Annoying Product Placement No
Action In or After Credits No

NOTE: The Profanity Filter is ON. Turn it off here.

Plot Synopsis

DOCTOR: It's possible they may have been anti-radiation gloves.... I mean drugs.

    After introducing the Doctor for the first time in An Unearthly Child, the creators of Dr Who wasted no time in producing a second cultural icon in the form of the Doctor's ultimate nemesis, the Daleks. Broadcast from 21 Dec 1963 and shown over seven episodes, The Daleks, only the second serial, marks the moment when Dr Who really gathers some steam. The Doctor (William Hartnell), his granddaughter Susan (Carole Ann Ford), and reluctant companions Ian (William Russell) and Barbara (Jacqueline Hill) are taken by the TARDIS to the dead planet Skaro. The peoples of Skaro, the Dal and the Thal have all but wiped each other out in a nuclear war and the few survivors live unaware of the other race's existence. When the Doctor insists on investigating the Dal city and stoops to sabotaging the TARDIS to do so, the TARDIS crew are soon captured by the Dal in their new salt-shaker, robotic form: the Daleks. The Doctor and his companions must prevent the Daleks from releasing further radioactive material into the atmosphere and help the Thal (now an Aryan pacifist group) realize that some things are worth fighting for (like fixing the Doctor's TARDIS for instance!).

    Admittedly, some of The Daleks' plot developments feel a little contrived and forced, but generally speaking, this serial is high on drama and suspense and, for the first time, it feels like the Doctor and his friends are actually in mortal peril. The trek beneath the mountains and through the deadly swamps lead by Ian and Barbara is particularly high on tense moments and you can't help but feel something of a thrill when the Daleks first cry out "Exterminate!" (Well - they call for "extermination," but that's close enough). The Daleks were immediately embraced by British children and would go on to rank as some of the all-time greatest villains in science fiction. No sign of Davros here, but the Daleks enter the Dr Who universe fully formed and ready to hate the Doctor. The Daleks alone is worth the price of the Dr Who - Beginning box-set. Highly recommended.

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Transfer Quality

Video

    The Daleks continues at the same level of video quality seen in An Unearthly Child. The serial is presented in its original full frame aspect ratio of 1.29:1.

    Sharpness and shadow detail are by no means perfect, but given the limitations of the source material, are actually realized very nicely. The image has a general softness, worsened by the levels of grain, but is quite acceptable. Compared to An Unearthly Child, the image is a little softer due to being shot on film rather than video. Contrast and grey scale for the black and white image are also very good. Don't expect the transfer to be as sharp as modern productions, but then don't expect poor detail either. Compared to footage found in the extra features, The Daleks looks fantastic.

    The opening credits exhibit some relatively heavy macroblocking, but the rest of the feature shows only minor pixelization due to visible grain. I also noticed some moments of posterization at times and some moments of very minor wobble in the image. The TARDIS can show aliasing at times. Torch lights leave comet trails and mild microphony can be seen. Mild tracking errors are visible, usually at the top of the image. Keep an eye out for boom mike shadows.

    Subtitles are excellent, as always, and presented in a readable, white font. Very few words are dropped from the titles. Also included are the usual informational subtitles.

Video Ratings Summary
Sharpness
Shadow Detail
Colour
Grain/Pixelization
Film-To-Video Artefacts
Film Artefacts
Overall

Audio

    Audio is presented in Dolby Digital 2.0 mono and is adequate and faithful to the source.

    Dialogue is clear and audible. Constant hiss is audible during the entire serial. The mono audio is naturally somewhat flat and undynamic, but perfectly acceptable. High pitched mechanical squeals are reproduced nicely. Audio sync is accurate.

    Tristan Carey provides the score, using musique concrete (industrial sounds) to create an eerie, otherworldly atmosphere.

    There is no surround or bass information.

Audio Ratings Summary
Dialogue
Audio Sync
Clicks/Pops/Dropouts
Surround Channel Use
Subwoofer
Overall

Extras

Main Menu Introduction

Menu Animation & Audio

Audio Commentary

    Gary Russell moderates the commentaries once again. Episode 2 features producer Verity Lambert and director Christopher Barry. Episode 4 features Christopher Barry, Carole Ann Ford and William Russell and Episode 7 features William Russell and Carole Ann Ford and director Richard Martin. Highly informative and Gary Russell's moderation is very welcome.

Featurette

    Creation of the Daleks (17:10) - Talking heads discuss the construction, design, and vocal work behind the Daleks, praising creators Terry Nation (writer) and Raymond Cusick (designer). Apparently the Daleks were very nearly designed by Ridley Scott. Well made and informative.

Gallery-Photo

    (5:32) - Behind the scenes photographs with audio accompaniment.

Informational Subtitles

    I prefer this feature to commentaries in most cases. There is a good deal of overlap with the information provided in the commentaries and featurettes, though.

R4 vs R1

NOTE: To view non-R4 releases, your equipment needs to be multi-zone compatible and usually also NTSC compatible.

    Both the Region 1 (bar NTSC formatting) and Region 2 releases are identical to ours.

Summary

    Only the second serial in the series and Dr Who pulls out the stops to produce an exciting adventure in The Daleks.

    Video quality is very good considering the limitations of the source.

    Audio is adequate.

    Extras are informative and interesting.

Ratings (out of 5)

Video
Audio
Extras
Plot
Overall

© Adam Atkinson (read my bio)
Wednesday, May 03, 2006
Review Equipment
DVDSony DVP-S336, using Component output
DisplayLG Flatron Widescreen RT-28FZ85RX. Calibrated with THX Optimizer. This display device is 16x9 capable.
Audio DecoderBuilt in to amplifier/receiver. Calibrated with THX Optimizer.
AmplificationYamaha RX-V357
SpeakersDB Dynamics Belmont Series: Fronts: B50F, Centre: B50C, Rears: B50S, Sub: SW8BR

Other Reviews NONE
Comments (Add) NONE
Overall | Doctor Who-An Unearthly Child (1963) | Doctor Who-The Daleks (1963) | Doctor Who-The Edge of Destruction (1964)

Doctor Who-The Edge of Destruction (1964)

Doctor Who-The Edge of Destruction (1964)

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Released 2-Mar-2006

Cover Art

This review is sponsored by
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Details At A Glance

General Extras
Category Science Fiction Main Menu Introduction
Menu Animation & Audio
Featurette-Doctor Who: Origins
Featurette-Over The Edge
Featurette-Inside The Spaceship
Featurette-Masters Of Sound
Featurette-Marco Polo
Gallery-Photo
Alternate Audio-Episode 2 With Arabic Soundtrack
DVD-ROM Extras
Informational Subtitles
Rating Rated PG
Year Of Production 1964
Running Time 78:52 (Case: 193)
RSDL / Flipper Dual Layered Cast & Crew
Start Up Menu
Region Coding 2,4 Directed By Frank Cox
Richard Martin
Studio
Distributor

Roadshow Home Entertainment
Starring William Hartnell
Carole Ann Ford
William Russell
Jacqueline Hill
Case Amaray-Transparent-Secure Clip
RPI Box Music None Given


Video Audio
Pan & Scan/Full Frame Full Frame English Dolby Digital 2.0 (192Kb/s)
Widescreen Aspect Ratio None
16x9 Enhancement No
Video Format 576i (PAL)
Original Aspect Ratio 1.33:1 Miscellaneous
Jacket Pictures No
Subtitles English for the Hearing Impaired
English Information
Smoking Yes, in Extra Features
Annoying Product Placement No
Action In or After Credits No

NOTE: The Profanity Filter is ON. Turn it off here.

Plot Synopsis

    Written by script editor David Whittaker to fill in a short gap in production, the two-part serial The Edge of Destruction reveals something of the Doctor's darker side but also resolves the somewhat icy relationship developing between the Doctor (William Hartnell) and Ian (William Russell) and Barbara (Jacqueline Hill). After leaving Skaro, the TARDIS is brought to a sudden halt by a shock wave. As the crew slowly come around, amnesia and the claustrophobic atmosphere of the TARDIS set the companions against each other. The Doctor is determined to evict Ian and Barbara from his ship and Susan (Carole Ann Ford) develops a homicidal attraction to scissors. The TARDIS continues to send shock waves through its occupants and the usually reliable Fault Locator doesn't reveal a thing. Perhaps the TARDIS is trying to tell them something?....

    The Edge of Destruction, although a little hurried, works effectively in producing a very eerie atmosphere. The set is almost silent, and the inexplicable actions of the characters, especially Susan, carry very dark undertones. Most importantly, though, the rift between the Doctor and his kidnapped companions is given a chance to heal. After wild accusations from both sides, the TARDIS crew learn to work together and recognize each other's strengths. By the end of the serial, Ian and Barbara have accepted their fate and are able to share a happy moment or two with the Doctor.

    After the Daleks serial, Edge of Destruction feels a little of a let-down in terms of action and excitement. But its foreboding atmosphere and exploration of the TARDIS, mixed with a little character development, helps strengthen the foundation for Dr Who.

Don't wish to see plot synopses in the future? Change your configuration.

Transfer Quality

Video

    Once again, considering the source material, The Edge of Destruction video transfer is very good. The serial has been transferred in its original full-frame aspect ratio of 1.33:1.

    Sharpness is good. Film segments are softer on detail than video. The presence of video grain throughout tends to soften the image and blur motion a little. The limited focus depth of the cameras used leave some elements unfocused. Shadow detail is a little murky, but quite decent. The serial is considerably sharper and more detailed than the footage presented in the extra features. Contrast and grey scale are good.

    MPEG artefacts are mostly absent. The opening credits exhibit some relatively heavy macroblocking, but the rest of the feature shows only minor pixelization due to visible grain. I also noticed some moments of posterization at times. Hard lines can show aliasing at times. Some minor edge enhancement is visible as is a little interlacing. A few specks of dust are visible but the transfer is quite clean in general.

    Subtitles are excellent, as always, and presented in a readable, white font. Very few words are dropped from the titles. Also included are the usual informational subtitles.

Video Ratings Summary
Sharpness
Shadow Detail
Colour
Grain/Pixelization
Film-To-Video Artefacts
Film Artefacts
Overall

Audio

    Audio is presented in Dolby Digital 2.0 mono and is adequate and faithful to the source.

    Dialogue is clear and audible. Constant hiss is audible during the entire serial. The mono audio is naturally somewhat flat and undynamic, but perfectly acceptable. Audio sync is accurate.

    Incidental music was taken from stock music files and has been selected to heighten the foreboding atmosphere.

    There is no surround or bass information.

Audio Ratings Summary
Dialogue
Audio Sync
Clicks/Pops/Dropouts
Surround Channel Use
Subwoofer
Overall

Extras

Main Menu Introduction

Menu Animation & Audio

Featurette

    Dr Who - Origins (53:51) - An excellent and very thorough recounting of the development and beginnings of Dr Who. Features recent interviews with producer Verity Lambert and directors, actors, and crew members and archive interviews with the head of drama at the BBC, Sydney Newman, the documentary is well worth watching and contains a wealth of information.

Featurette

    Over the Edge (29:22) - Documentary on the making of the serial, revealing the reasons for such a short story and why two directors were involved along with the usual information on filming and development.

Featurette

    Inside the Spaceship (10:14) - Documents the development and design of the TARDIS.

Featurette

    Masters of Sound (12:23) - Unseen footage from the 1993 documentary Thirty Years in the TARDIS. Focuses on the BBC Radio Workshop's contributions to Dr Who in creating Foley effects and producing the title theme. Ever wondered how they created the TARDIS' woosh or how the theme was composed and recorded? It's all here.

Featurette

    Marco Polo (31:25) - Every Who fan holds a small grudge towards the BBC and its policy of erasing early broadcasts. Several Dr Who serials are all but lost, including the Doctor's fourth adventures in the Himalayas with Marco Polo. The studio sound recording survives and the serial has been reassembled in a shortened version using stills from the shoot. The story is actually quite enjoyable, if a little culturally insensitive, and its condensed form has it moving along at a rollicking pace. An excellent and valuable inclusion.

Gallery-Photo

    (5:09) - Behind the scenes photographs accompanied by audio.

Alternate Audio

    The second episode includes an Arabian soundtrack. Just for kicks I suppose.

DVD-ROM Extras

    PDF files of the shooting script for Episode One and clippings from the Radio Times magazine showing broadcast details for the early Dr Who serials.

Informational Subtitles

    Trivia titles with information culled mostly from the extra features already listed.

R4 vs R1

NOTE: To view non-R4 releases, your equipment needs to be multi-zone compatible and usually also NTSC compatible.

    Both the Region 1 (bar NTSC formatting) and Region 2 releases are identical to ours.

Summary

    Short in length but high on atmosphere and character development, The Edge of Destruction plays an important role elevating Dr Who above and beyond standard children's television.

    Video and audio have been transferred well and are very good, considering source limitations.

    Extras are expansive and informative and relevant to each of the serials included in the Beginnings box set.

Ratings (out of 5)

Video
Audio
Extras
Plot
Overall

© Adam Atkinson (read my bio)
Thursday, May 04, 2006
Review Equipment
DVDSony DVP-S336, using Component output
DisplayLG Flatron Widescreen RT-28FZ85RX. Calibrated with THX Optimizer. This display device is 16x9 capable.
Audio DecoderBuilt in to amplifier/receiver. Calibrated with THX Optimizer.
AmplificationYamaha RX-V357
SpeakersDB Dynamics Belmont Series: Fronts: B50F, Centre: B50C, Rears: B50S, Sub: SW8BR

Other Reviews NONE
Comments (Add) NONE