Scre4m (Scream 4) (Blu-ray) (2011)

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Released 13-Oct-2011

Cover Art

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Details At A Glance

General Extras
Category Horror Featurette-Making Of-(10:30)
Outtakes-(9:21)
Alternative Version-(3:25) Opening
Alternate Ending-(2:14)
Deleted Scenes-(18:53) 17 scenes
Audio Commentary-Feature Length with director and two stars
Rating Rated MA
Year Of Production 2011
Running Time 110:39
RSDL / Flipper No/No Cast & Crew
Start Up Programme
Region Coding 4 Directed By Wes Craven
Studio
Distributor

Roadshow Home Entertainment
Starring Neve Campbell
Lucy Hale
Roger Jackson
David Arquette
Dane Farwell
Courtney Cox
Anna Paquin
Rory Culkin
Kristen Bell
Hayden Panetierre
Brittany Robertson
Erik Knudsen
Mary McDonnell
Case Standard Blu-ray
RPI $29.95 Music Marco Beltrami


Video Audio
Pan & Scan/Full Frame Auto Pan & Scan Encoded English DTS HD Master Audio 5.1
English Audio Commentary dts 2.0
English Linear PCM 48/20 2.0
English Audio Commentary Linear PCM 48/20 2.0
Widescreen Aspect Ratio 2.40:1
16x9 Enhancement
16x9 Enhanced
Video Format 1080p
Original Aspect Ratio 2.40:1 Miscellaneous
Jacket Pictures No
Subtitles English for the Hearing Impaired Smoking No
Annoying Product Placement No
Action In or After Credits Yes, Do NOT miss one second.

NOTE: The Profanity Filter is ON. Turn it off here.

Plot Synopsis

     Undoubtedly film-maker Wes Craven is primarily known as the creative force behind two of the most successful horror franchises in film history, the Nightmare on Elm Street and Scream series. Along the way there have been other films from Craven, including the memorably touching Music of the Heart in 1999, which starred Meryl Street just before she became "hot" the second time around. This "feel good" movie is still available and is well worth seeking out. Craven has returned as director for Scream 4, the final (?) instalment in the Scream series, and many fans see it as a return to form after the disappointing second and third instalments.

     Without spoiling the tongue in cheek, movie-within-a-movie opening of the film, we are treated to a very neat send-up of the present movie dependence on remakes and sequels, with surprising appearances from Anna Paquin and Kristen Bell.This clever sequence addresses and parodies the problem of barren repetitiveness found in many of today's movies, while at the same time establishing a mood of zany irreverence. Once we get into Kevin Williamson's new screenplay, we have the established characters returning, older and slightly changed. Sidney Prescott (Neve Campbell) has returned to Woodsboro, the scene of the original "Ghostface" slasher murders. She is promoting her new tell-all book, but it is not long before a new spate of murders starts to reduce the population. Protection is sought in the form of Dewey (David Arquette) who is now sheriff. Dewey's wife, the former Gale Weathers (Courteney Cox), still struggling with a life of retired domesticity, wants to get in on the action of solving the murders. Spicing up the narrative are the new, younger faces, all of whom qualify as possibilities to be the new "Ghostface". Could it be Dewey's young, butch deputy (Marley Shelton), Sidney's younger cousin, Jill (Emma Roberts), her unfaithful boyfriend Trevor (Nico Tortorella) or Jill's best friend, horror buff Kirby (Hayden Panetierre)? Finally we have the two nerds who run the school film club, Charlie (Rory Culkin) and Robbie (Erik Knudsen), who record everything with a perpetually running webcam. Then there is Sidney's strange aunt Kate (Mary McDonnell).

     Each character is presented as a potential suspect, and red herrings abound in Williamson's screenplay. There are twists and coincidences galore, all made more acceptable by the self-deprecating humour and wit of the script.Wes Craven's direction gets the most out of every tense moment, and photography and Marco Beltrami's music combine to keep the spine tingling.

     I am not a great admirer of this genre, but I do love films in general, and basically this is a movie that is about movies. It is well written, entertainingly paced and exceptionally well crafted. The cast, old and new, are excellent, with Hayden Panetierre really standing out. Fans of the series should be very happy with this clever and witty farewell to Ghostface.

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Transfer Quality

Video

     We are given a transfer that beautifully and appropriately recreates the cinema experience.

     Presented at the ratio of 2.40:1 in a 1080p transfer, the image is extremely sharp, without having the eye-popping clarity of the best Blu-ray transfers. I assume that the intention is to create a film-like experience, and that has been accomplished. The widescreen image is sharp and clear, with a definitely film-like grain structure. Detail is excellent, and especially impressive in the many dark sequences, where every shadowy nook and cranny is beautifully detailed. Blacks are excellent while the colour is a little on the warm side, with the golden or bronze skin tones which abound in many films.

     Although not a demonstration quality disc, this is a very fine transfer. without any noteworthy faults.

     There are English Subtitles for the Hearing Impaired which were sampled and found to be excellent. Two colours are used to differentiate between speakers, with appropriate placement across the image. A third colour is used for sound effects, such as ringing phones.

Video Ratings Summary
Sharpness
Shadow Detail
Colour
Grain/Pixelization
Film-To-Video Artefacts
Film Artefacts
Overall

Audio

There are four English audio streams : DTS-HD Master Audio 5.1, DTS 2.0 Commentary Track, PCM Stereo Surround Encoded and a PCM Commentary Track. The feature was watched employing the DTS-HD 5.1 track, which gave an immersive and exciting aural experience.

     Dialogue was front and centre and without a blemish. There were no sync problems. Front and rear channels are extremely active with ambient noises, as well as the numerous effects of the film. Dogs barking, birds chirping, slashing knives, telephones ringing, creaking doors all assault our ears - frequently providing aural red herrings as well as shocks. In addition Marco Beltrami's score surrounds us, providing many hair raising moments. Not to be outdone, the subwoofer has plenty of opportunities to provide oomph to both the effects and the music. This is a very enjoyably busy soundtrack.

     The Descriptive Narration for the Vision Impaired was sampled and found to be excellent, delivered by a sedate, youngish male voice.

Audio Ratings Summary
Dialogue
Audio Sync
Clicks/Pops/Dropouts
Surround Channel Use
Subwoofer
Overall

Extras

Start-Up Trailers :

     On start-up we are served up three trailers, all presented at 2.40:1 in 1080p and looking excellent. Annoyingly, I could not avoid having to run these trailers every time I started the disc.

Main Menu

     The menu is presented over a live montage of scenes from the film, combined with a still graphic. One of the songs from the soundtrack is used behind the menus

Featurette: The Making of Scream 4 (10:30)

     Hosted by Wes Craven, this is a genial behind the scenes featurette which concentrates more on getting the cast and crew back together for this instalment. It is all warm and friendly, with the expected comments about the project and working together and fans will enjoy what is offered. It is all very brief and a bit too light to give any real satisfaction. The featurette footage is presented at 1.78:1 with excerpts from the film at 2.40:1, all in 1080p.

Gag Reel (9:21)

     Presented at 2.40:1 in 1080p, this is what you would expect. Lots of actors being spooked by crew wearing sheets and the famous mask. Enjoyable nonsense.

Alternate Opening (3:25)

     This is very interesting and well worth looking at. Presented in 1080p at 2.40:1.

Alternate Ending (2:14)

     Also well worth a look, but wait until you've seen the film. Presented in 1080p at 2.40:1.

Deleted Scenes (18:53)

     All presented in 1080p at 2.40:1, there are seventeen individual deleted scenes, with the option to "Play All", or select an individual scene.

Audio Commentary :

     This feature length commentary is given by the director, Wes Craven, and two of the attractive female stars, Emma Roberts and Hayden Panetierre. It is all very genial and chatty as the trio watch the movie and reflect on their impressions as the film was being made. After about fifteen minutes Neve Campbell enters the conversation via phone, staying for about forty-five minutes. This is all good natured and amusing, with anecdotes about script changes, the atmosphere on the set and location filming. Fans will no doubt enjoy listening to the stars reflect on making the movie.

Censorship

    There is censorship information available for this title. Click here to read it (a new window will open). WARNING: Often these entries contain MAJOR plot spoilers.

R4 vs R1

NOTE: To view non-R4 releases, your equipment needs to be multi-zone compatible and usually also NTSC compatible.

     There is a two disc Blu-ray release of this title in the United States. Basically it contains the same extras, with the following differences. Our local release misses out on:

Summary

     This latest, and supposedly last, entry in the Scream franchise is a surprisingly enjoyable feast of fright and fun. There is much wit at the expense of the shock film industry, and the production and execution are first rate. Performances are spot on all round, from the experienced originals to the new recruits. The transfer looks just right, for a movie that's really about movies, and the soundtrack delivers solidly when called upon - which is often. There is a nice collection of fluffy extras which round off an enjoyable fright night at the flicks.

Ratings (out of 5)

Video
Audio
Extras
Plot
Overall

© Garry Armstrong (BioGarry)
Friday, December 02, 2011
Review Equipment
DVDSONY BLU RAY BDP-S350, using HDMI output
DisplaySamsung LA55A950D1F : 55 inch LCD HD. Calibrated with THX Optimizer. This display device is 16x9 capable. This display device has a maximum native resolution of 1080p.
Audio DecoderBuilt in to DVD player. Calibrated with THX Optimizer.
AmplificationOnkyo TX-DS777
SpeakersVAF DC-X fronts; VAF DC-6 center; VAF DC-2 rears; LFE-07subwoofer (80W X 2)

Other Reviews NONE
Comments (Add)
They always come back! - Bran (my bio, or something very like it)