Someone to Watch Over Me (1987)

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Released 6-Dec-2000

Cover Art

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Details At A Glance

General Extras
Category Thriller Theatrical Trailer
Biographies-Cast & Crew
Rating Rated M
Year Of Production 1987
Running Time 102:13
RSDL / Flipper No/No Cast & Crew
Start Up Menu
Region Coding 2,4 Directed By Ridley Scott
Studio
Distributor

Sony Pictures Home Entertain
Starring Tom Berenger
Mimi Rogers
Lorraine Bracco
Jerry Orbach
John Rubinstein
Case Brackley-Trans-No Lip
RPI $36.95 Music Michael Kamen


Video Audio
Pan & Scan/Full Frame None English Dolby Digital 2.0 (192Kb/s)
French Dolby Digital 2.0 (192Kb/s)
German Dolby Digital 2.0 (192Kb/s)
Italian Dolby Digital 2.0 (192Kb/s)
Spanish Dolby Digital 2.0 (192Kb/s)
Widescreen Aspect Ratio 1.78:1
16x9 Enhancement
16x9 Enhanced
Video Format 576i (PAL)
Original Aspect Ratio 1.85:1 Miscellaneous
Jacket Pictures No
Subtitles English
French
German
Italian
Spanish
Dutch
Arabic
Czech
Danish
Finnish
Greek
Hebrew
Hindi
Hungarian
Icelandic
Norwegian
Polish
Portuguese
Swedish
Turkish
Smoking Yes
Annoying Product Placement No
Action In or After Credits No

NOTE: The Profanity Filter is ON. Turn it off here.

Plot Synopsis

Mike Keegan (Tom Berenger) has just made Detective. His first assignment, as he describes it to his wife Ellie (Lorraine Bracco), is a babysitting job. He has to guard a wealthy woman Claire Gregory (Mimi Rogers), who witnessed the brutal murder of a close friend. The police want Claire protected until they can pick up the killer (Andreas Katsulas), so the round-the-clock protection begins. Mike and Ellie have been very happily married for many years, but Claire's personality and lifestyle slowly seduces Mike and when Claire becomes interested in Mike, a passionate affair ensues, which of course threatens Mike's job and marriage.

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Transfer Quality

Video

The transfer is presented in an aspect ratio of 1.78:1 and is 16x9 enhanced.

The picture is extremely clear and sharp at all times in both the foreground and background. The shadow detail is spot on. There are a couple of scenes that are intentionally dark with little detail in the black areas, but they still look natural and visually pleasing. No low-level noise, edge bleeding or excessive edge enhancement was ever noticed. I found the opening scene of the city at night particularly impressive on the big screen.

The colour was exemplary - beautifully saturated with wonderful skin tones throughout. It is one of the best transfers I have ever seen for a movie made in the 80s.

There are quite a few scenes that suffer from either trivial or minor grain, but this grain is not terribly disruptive as it never affects the foreground picture. The most noticeable instances can be found at 18:36-19:20, 23:00, 26:30, 58:28 and 86:20. No pixelization was noticed.

No MPEG artefacts were seen. Another impressive aspect of this transfer is its total lack of aliasing, with not a single occurrence noted throughout the entire transfer. I'm sure if you looked hard enough you would be able to find at least one or two occurrences somewhere, but really...

Film artefacts were very rare and were almost always small and unobtrusive, such as at 18:12 and shortly thereafter where a medium-sized scratch appears.

Video Ratings Summary
Sharpness
Shadow Detail
Colour
Grain/Pixelization
Film-To-Video Artefacts
Film Artefacts
Overall

Audio

The audio is clear and clean but is predominantly up-front and the dialogue is strongly centred on most occasions.

There are five 192Kb/sec Dolby Digital 2.0 surround-encoded tracks on this DVD; English, French, German, Italian and Spanish. I listened to the default English soundtrack.

The dialogue was extremely clear and easy to understand throughout the entire movie, except for one line from Tom Berenger at 61:42 which I could not make out, even after several attempts to decipher it.

Audio sync was not a problem at all with this transfer, and was completely spot-on.

Michael Kamen's music score definitely suited the movie.

The surround channels are predominantly used for music with the odd sound effect thrown in. For a lot of the movie I was unaware that the rear speakers were even there. The dialogue was strongly centred on many occasions, which made the front soundstage sound quite narrow. The most noticeable surround use can be found at 17:32 and 98:15 - both are musical instances.

The subwoofer is very lightly used throughout the movie to enhance the music.

Audio Ratings Summary
Dialogue
Audio Sync
Clicks/Pops/Dropouts
Surround Channel Use
Subwoofer
Overall

Extras

The extras are very limited, consisting of the usual Cast & Crew filmographies/biographies plus a trailer.

Menu

The Menus are presented in an aspect ratio of 1.33:1 and consist of still pictures. The menu selections are; Languages/Audio Set-Up, Subtitles, Scene Selections (28), Extra Features and Play Movie.

Cast and Crew

This section contains Biographies and Filmographies for Ridley Scott (Director), Tom Berenger, Mimi Rogers and Lorraine Bracco.

Theatrical Trailer

Overall, the picture quality is very good. It is presented in an aspect ratio of 1.33:1, with a Dolby Digital 2.0 soundtrack. There is some grain and trivial telecine wobble.

R4 vs R1

NOTE: To view non-R4 releases, your equipment needs to be multi-zone compatible and usually also NTSC compatible.

The Region 4 version of this disc misses out on; The Region 1 version of this disc misses out on; With the R1 disc having the same limitations plus some minor edge enhancement, the R4 disc is an easy choice. Of course if you want the 4x3 version, you will have to by the R1 disc.

Summary

I really enjoyed Someone to Watch Over Me.

The video transfer of this movie is superb, and only misses out on being reference quality because of the minor grain.

Overall the audio is good, with no transfer-induced faults. The lack of surround and subwoofer use are the only things that reduce its rating.

The extras are very limited.

Ratings (out of 5)

Video
Audio
Extras
Plot
Overall

© Paul Williams (read Paul's biography)
Monday, December 04, 2000
Review Equipment
DVDSony DVP-725, using Component output
DisplaySony Projector VPH-G70 (No Line Doubler), Technics Da-Lite matt screen with gain of 1.0 (229cm). Calibrated with Video Essentials. This display device is 16x9 capable.
Audio DecoderBuilt in to DVD player. Calibrated with Video Essentials.
AmplificationOnkyo TX-SV919THX
SpeakersFronts: Energy RVS-1 (3), Rears: Energy RVSS-1 (2), Subwoofer: Energy EPS-150 (1)

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