Ocean's Thirteen (2007)

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Released 12-Oct-2007

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Details At A Glance

General Extras
Category Caper Featurette-Vegas - An Opulent Illusion
Interviews-Crew-Jerry Weintraub Walk and Talk
Deleted Scenes
Rating Rated PG
Year Of Production 2007
Running Time 117:07
RSDL / Flipper RSDL (57:10) Cast & Crew
Start Up Menu
Region Coding 4 Directed By Steven Soderbergh
Studio
Distributor

Roadshow Home Entertainment
Starring George Clooney
Brad Pitt
Matt Damon
Elliott Gould
Bernie Mac
Al Pacino
Don Cheadle
Casey Affleck
Eddie Jemison
Scott Caan
Shaobo Qin
Carl Reiner
Eddie Izzard
Case Amaray-Transparent
RPI $29.95 Music David Holmes


Video Audio
Pan & Scan/Full Frame None English Dolby Digital 5.1 (384Kb/s)
English Dolby Digital 2.0 (224Kb/s)
English Descriptive Audio Dolby Digital 2.0 (224Kb/s)
Widescreen Aspect Ratio 2.40:1
16x9 Enhancement
16x9 Enhanced
Video Format 576i (PAL)
Original Aspect Ratio 2.40:1 Miscellaneous
Jacket Pictures No
Subtitles English Smoking Yes
Annoying Product Placement No
Action In or After Credits Yes

NOTE: The Profanity Filter is ON. Turn it off here.

Plot Synopsis

    With suitable relish, Al Pacino makes a villainous and welcome appearance in this, the third film in the Ocean's canon. In Ocean's Thirteen, Pacino is the aptly named Willie Bank, a new-style Las Vegas casino boss who cares little for other people, even less for tradition, and spares no expense in building the biggest and most opulent casino and hotel in the city. Ever the tycoon, he will also stop at nothing and let nobody get in his way until he owns the entire town.

    But Bank is about to bite off just a bit more than he can handle when he swindles Reuben Tishkoff (Elliot Gould). Flush with cash from the previous heists in Ocean's Eleven and Ocean's Twelve, Rueben has been dealing with Bank in his major new venture. But when Bank pulls the rug from under Rueben, leaving the casino purist in a comatose state, bedridden and unable to speak - Danny Ocean (George Clooney) and friends come to the rescue. Ocean and his pals from the original film including Rusty (Brad Pitt) and Linus (Matt Damon) all return to exact some revenge on the unscrupulous Bank. And what a revenge it is likely to be. With a bag of money at their disposal, Ocean's team has the resources and the nous to pull off the mother of all swindles. The plan is simple - Opening night for Bank's new casino is just a few weeks away. Ocean's gang plan to rig it, so that every punter who walks in the door in those opening hours will walk out a winner. By rigging every game in favour of the punter, the boys plan to wreak the ultimate revenge on one of the richest men in Las Vegas - by effectively ruining him in just a few hours.

    With the caper film genre you always know the ending pretty much from the start. But what's important in this often fun style of film is the journey. It has to be elaborate, fun, and contain a few surprises or two. Most of these criteria are filled here with a complex (though not too complex to follow) plan to rig each of the games in the casino. This creates a series of side plots as Ocean's boys set about rigging dice at a factory in Mexico and impersonating the top rating Michelin-style restaurant/hotel quality inspector who has been sent to examine every detail of Bank's new hotel before proclaiming it a winner of the prestigious Five Diamond award.

This is a real fun film, with plenty of gags, elaborate tricks and stunts, and some good old-fashioned story telling and comes highly recommended. If you loved Ocean's Eleven and were slightly disappointed with Ocean's Twelve, this offering should convince you that director Steven Soderbergh has not lost his magic touch.

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Transfer Quality

Video

    The video is offered in exactly the same aspect ratio as it was shown theatrically, this being 2.40:1. It is also 16x9 enhanced.

    I was a little disappointed with the sharpness and detail level on offer here. The whole thing has just the slightest hint of softness and while shadow detail is adequately handled, grain is pretty much present from the opening titles to the closing credits. From the overall look of the film this grainy approach seems to be artistically intentional. There is no low level noise.

    The colours are extremely well-rendered, matching the original film for vibrancy and saturation.

    Thankfully there is no annoying shimmer or Aliasing.html" target="Aliasing">aliasing on any surface and film artefacts are absent.

    English subtitles are available, and after sampling these extensively I found them mostly accurate.

    This is a dual layered disc which is formatted RSDL. The layer change occurs at 57:10.

Video Ratings Summary
Sharpness
Shadow Detail
Colour
Grain/Pixelization
Film-To-Video Artefacts
Film Artefacts
Overall

Audio

    There are three audio soundtracks on this disc - all in English. First choice is the lovely English Dolby Digital 5.1 soundtrack, while for those requiring assistance there is an at-times scant descriptive soundtrack. There is also a Dolby Digital 2.0 stereo soundtrack rounding out the selection. Listening to the English Dolby Digital 5.1 track I was struck by how vibrant and fully-textured this soundtrack is. There are stacks of directional effects and fill-in surround effects used throughout. Much of the busy casinos springs to life with the surrounds in constant use. A great soundtrack all up and one that will make full use of all your speakers.

    There are no dialogue problems. It is always clear and prominent. There are no audio sync issues.
   
    Like he was for the earlier films David Holmes is again responsible for the score and it is again one of the highlights. It is snappy and breezy and captures the cheeky heist genre to perfection.

    There is a good amount of surround use and it provides a fairly decent enveloping experience when engaged.

    The subwoofer crops up on occasion, supporting a bit of the crash and bang, but it is mostly the low end of the score that benefits the most.

Audio Ratings Summary
Dialogue
Audio Sync
Clicks/Pops/Dropouts
Surround Channel Use
Subwoofer
Overall

Extras

Featurette - Vegas: An Opulent Illusion

    This is a really interesting look at the amazing city that is Las Vegas. Presented in an almost documentary style and narrated by actor DB Sweeney, there are stacks of photos and vision from the days when the town was just a desert outpost, through the humble beginnings of the first casinos to the arrival of the over-the-top mega themed-resorts. Runs for a decent 22:47 and contains very little self-promotional fluff. Highly recommended to gain an appreciation of just what an extravagant place Las Vegas is and how it is a city that seems to radically reinvent itself every couple of decades.

Interviews-Crew

    Producer Jerry Weintraub takes us on a whirlwind tour of the set of The Bank casino. A complete waste of time that runs for just 2:25.

Deleted Scenes

    A few deleted scenes that run for a total of 4:35. Nothing to really set the world on fire here.

R4 vs R1

NOTE: To view non-R4 releases, your equipment needs to be multi-zone compatible and usually also NTSC compatible.

    From all reports the Region 1 disc is identical to this Region 4 offering.

Summary

    Thankfully Ocean's Thirteen leaves the over-blown self-indulgence of Ocean's Twelve behind with a return to the familiar surroundings of Las Vegas. This is the sequel we should have had to the sassy, fun and funky Ocean's Eleven. This is a slick and highly enjoyable film that comes recommended for a great night's viewing.

    The video transfer is free from major blemish, but is quite grainy - obviously an artistic choice.

    The audio track is excellent and will have you grooving in your seat.

    The extras are pretty light, though the major featurette on Las Vegas is quite informative.

Ratings (out of 5)

Video
Audio
Extras
Plot
Overall

© Darren Walters (It's . . . just the vibe . . . of my bio)
Friday, November 09, 2007
Review Equipment
DVDDenon DVD-3910, using HDMI output
DisplayPanasonic TH-42PX600A 42" Plasma. Calibrated with Digital Video Essentials (PAL). This display device is 16x9 capable.
Audio DecoderBuilt in to amplifier/receiver. Calibrated with Digital Video Essentials (PAL).
AmplificationHarmon/Kardon AVR7000.
SpeakersFront - B&W 602S2, Centre - B&W CC6S2, Rear - B&W 601S2, Sub - Energy E:xl S10

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