Page One: Inside the New York Times (2011)

If you create a user account, you can add your own review of this DVD

Released 14-Dec-2011

Cover Art

This review is sponsored by
BUY IT

Details At A Glance

General Extras
Category Documentary None
Rating Rated M
Year Of Production 2011
Running Time 88:00
RSDL / Flipper Dual Layered Cast & Crew
Start Up Menu
Region Coding 4 Directed By Andrew Rossi
Studio
Distributor

Madman Entertainment
Starring Kate Novack
Andrew Rossi
Tim Arango
Julian Assange
Carl Bernstein
David Carr
Bruce Headlam
Bill Keller
Brian Stelter
Brian Stetler
Jimmy Wales
Case Amaray-Transparent
RPI $29.95 Music Paul Brill


Video Audio
Pan & Scan/Full Frame None English Dolby Digital 5.1 (448Kb/s)
Widescreen Aspect Ratio 1.85:1
16x9 Enhancement
16x9 Enhanced
Video Format 576i (PAL)
Original Aspect Ratio 1.85:1 Miscellaneous
Jacket Pictures No
Subtitles None Smoking No
Annoying Product Placement No
Action In or After Credits No

NOTE: The Profanity Filter is ON. Turn it off here.

Plot Synopsis

     Around the United States, around the World, more and more print media companies are going to the wall. Page One - Inside the New York Times looks at this most venerable of broadsheets and asks the question - could the mightiest newspaper on the planet fall from its pedestal and more tellingly, what role does the traditional print media have to play in the future of reportage and information gathering?

     It has been a bleak past few years for the Times. When director Andrew Rossi is given unprecedented 14 month long access to the newsroom in 2009 he finds a business and an industry under siege. Young people don't read newspapers anymore. The older generation are also slowly being drawn in by digital media. Advertising revenues have hit rock bottom and the Times' attempts to compete on-line haven't been great successes. It is not just newspapers. Magazines are suffering too. Just take a look at the frequency with which Who Magazine features full page adverts stating that they are not in trouble!

     Page One introduces us to some key players in the future of the Times. Editor David Farrell is putting a brave face on the crisis whilst reducing the number of reporters. The new media reporting section is trying to report on the nature of the precipice without driving themselves off it. In a year many things can happen. In 2010 it was WikiLeaks. All of a sudden the traditional news sources are forced to compete for news with a renegade source, with little care for accountability. Getting into bed with Julian Assange may have sold a lot of papers, as the Times provided a daily summary of the embassy logs, but did it compromise their journalistic ethics?

     The film focusses on a couple of journalists including the recovering drug addict and hard man David Carr who bemoans the fact that in the modern age any person with any agenda can stick something on-line which becomes news without the role of the journalist, to enquire and verify, being engaged. The quietly arrogant bloggers respond with the clincher - the news is what has happened, not the journalists take on it, and how can a paper like the Times expect to be relevant when it is reporting yesterday’s news.

     The real answer of course is that there are some incisive on-line commentators but no-one quite like a seasoned journalist to expose the story behind the story.

Don't wish to see plot synopses in the future? Change your configuration.

Transfer Quality

Video

     Page One - Inside the New York Times comes to DVD in a 1.85:1 transfer consistent with the original cinematic aspect ratio. It is 16x9 enhanced.

     The documentary was shot on high-definition digital video. There are no real classic talking heads shots in the film. Instead the interviewees are filmed at their desk and on the run, off to investigate the next story. Consequently, this is not a pristine and elegant viewing experience. It was not meant to be. It is, however, a very satisfactory image quality bearing in mind the origins and intentions of the peace.

     There is some light digital noise throughout the film but otherwise no real technical defects. The colours are bright and stable and the flesh tones are accurate.

     Except for instances where the speaker is difficult to understand there are no subtitles.

Video Ratings Summary
Sharpness
Shadow Detail
Colour
Grain/Pixelization
Film-To-Video Artefacts
Film Artefacts
Overall

Audio

     The sound for Inside the New York Times is Dolby Digital 5.1 English running at 448 KP/S. The presence of a surround sound track is probably overkill for what is essentially interview material and conversation. There is little for the surrounds and sub-woofer to do.

     On occasions the sound is a little rough and ready as much of the film is done on the fly. On occasions there are subtitles where the dialogue is difficult to comprehend.

    The musical score is credited to Paul Brill.

Audio Ratings Summary
Dialogue
Audio Sync
Clicks/Pops/Dropouts
Surround Channel Use
Subwoofer
Overall

Extras

    There are no extras.

R4 vs R1

NOTE: To view non-R4 releases, your equipment needs to be multi-zone compatible and usually also NTSC compatible.

     This DVD is identical to the release in Region One. Buy local

Summary

     Being a fly on the wall at the New York Times allows us, the viewers, to see what it is like working in a newspaper office at a time of great change. If Inside the New York Times lacks a cohesive structure due to the vagaries of embedding a journalist in a group of journalists then the film makes up for it with the curious and queasy feeling that we may just be watching the last gasp of a dying breed. Inside the New York Times receives a decent DVD presentation in keeping with its filmic style. The lack of extras is perhaps no surprise but it still would have been nice to get an up-to-the-minute guide to the stock price of the Times!

Ratings (out of 5)

Video
Audio
Extras
Plot
Overall

© Trevor Darge (read my bio)
Wednesday, February 01, 2012
Review Equipment
DVDCambridge 650BD (All Regions), using HDMI output
DisplaySony VPL-VW80 Projector on 110" Screen. Calibrated with Video Essentials. This display device is 16x9 capable. This display device has a maximum native resolution of 1080p.
Audio DecoderBuilt in to amplifier/receiver. Calibrated with Ultimate DVD Platinum.
AmplificationPioneer SC-LX 81 7.1
SpeakersAaron ATS-5 7.1

Other Reviews NONE
Comments (Add) NONE