Robin Hood (1973)

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Released 12-Jun-2002

Cover Art

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Details At A Glance

General Extras
Category Childrens Menu Animation & Audio
Gallery-Art
Featurette-Ye Olden Days
Game
Karaoke-Oo-de-lally
Rating Rated G
Year Of Production 1973
Running Time 79:42
RSDL / Flipper RSDL (52:55) Cast & Crew
Start Up Language Select Then Menu
Region Coding 2,4 Directed By Wolfgang Reitherman
Studio
Distributor

Walt Disney Studios Home Ent.
Starring Peter Ustinov
Brian Bedford
Phil Harris
Terry Thomas
Monica Evans
Case Amaray-Transparent
RPI $34.95 Music George Bruns
Roger Miller


Video Audio
Pan & Scan/Full Frame Full Screen, not known whether Pan & Scan or Full Frame English Dolby Digital 5.1 (384Kb/s)
Norwegian Dolby Digital 5.1 (384Kb/s)
Danish Dolby Digital 5.1 (384Kb/s)
Widescreen Aspect Ratio None
16x9 Enhancement No
Video Format 576i (PAL)
Original Aspect Ratio 1.75:1 Miscellaneous
Jacket Pictures No
Subtitles English
English for the Hearing Impaired
Norwegian
Norwegian for the Hearing Impaired
Danish
Danish for the Hearing Impaired
Smoking No
Annoying Product Placement No
Action In or After Credits No

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Plot Synopsis

   Robin Hood (1973) is a Disney animated feature that re-works the classic tale of the outlaw and his merry men.

    The legend of Robin Hood (or Robin Hode) has existed in the UK since the Dark Ages. Originally a story told in poem or ballad form, it was later written down. The story, or stories, have changed dramatically over the centuries, and both plot elements and characters have been added and removed. For example, the character of Maid Marion is believed to be a relatively recent addition. During the Twentieth Century, over 70 movies and television programs have featured the hero who never seems to lose his popularity. I sense that the concept of robbing from the rich to give to the poor has universal appeal. Also, in a country like Australia, which is hideously over-taxed, Robin Hood 's distribution of taxes back to the people has special appeal -- at least to me.

    I imagine that the story is very familiar to all, but basically, King Richard has left for the Crusades. His younger brother, the inept Prince John (Peter Ustinov), has usurped the throne and is a cruel tyrant. With the help of his side-kick, Sir Hiss (Terry Thomas) and the Sheriff of Nottingham (Pat Buttram), Prince John is greedily taxing his subjects into poverty. The people's only respite is in the form of the loveable rogue, Robin Hood (Brian Bedford), who with the help of Little John (Phil Harris) and Friar Tuck (Andy Devine), steals some of the tax revenue from Prince John and returns it to the poor. When not being an instrument of social justice, Robin pursues his romance with Maid Marion (Monica Evans) who returns his affections. In this feature-length animated production, all the characters take the form of animals.

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Transfer Quality

Video

    This movie features very smooth animation, and it's always a pleasure to watch animation in the classic Disney style.

    The movie is presented in an aspect ratio of 1.33:1, pan & scan. This is a departure from the original aspect ratio of 1.75:1. Strangely, the packaging claims that the DVD has a 16x9 transfer.

    The foregrounds and characters are reasonably sharp, but some of the backgrounds appear a little soft. I imagine that this might be a reflection of the source material.

    The colour in this movie is excellent for its age (almost 30 years). As with most animated features, colour is used very subtly to manipulate the audience's feelings.

    There are no MPEG artefacts or film-to-video artefacts  to complain of, but film artefacts appear throughout. Considering the age of the source material, this is to be expected, and only a few scenes are adversely affected to the point of it being distracting. Edge enhancement also appears throughout.

    There are six sets of subtitles present on this DVD, and the English subtitles are accurate.

    This is a dual layered disc, with the layer change occurring at 52:55. It is in between scenes and not disruptive.

Video Ratings Summary
Sharpness
Shadow Detail
Colour
Grain/Pixelization
Film-To-Video Artefacts
Film Artefacts
Overall

Audio

    There are three audio tracks on this DVD: English, Norwegian, and Danish Dolby Digital 5.1 audio tracks.

    The dialogue quality and audio sync are generally up to the usual excellent quality for a Disney animated movie.

    The musical score is credited to George Bruns. The well known singer/songwriter Roger Miller also provides a number of songs with clever lyrics that advance the plot.

    Despite being a 5.1 mix, there is virtually no surround presence or subwoofer activity. A few very slight murmurs came from the rear speakers, and I did notice the subwoofer during a sequence with drums at 42:40.

Audio Ratings Summary
Dialogue
Audio Sync
Clicks/Pops/Dropouts
Surround Channel Use
Subwoofer
Overall

Extras

    Compared with some other Disney releases, this DVD has relatively few extras. All the extras are presented in an aspect ratio of 1.33:1, with Dolby Digital 2.0 audio.

Menu

    An animated menu.

Robin Hood Art Gallery

    Photographs and conceptual art from the production.

Cartoon: Ye Olden Days (8:00)

    A Disney short from 1933 featuring Mickey Mouse.

Robin Hood's Merry Games

    A simple kid's game using the DVD remote.

Oo-de-lally Sing Along

    A karaoke style 'sing along' featuring one of Roger Miller's songs from the movie.

R4 vs R1

NOTE: To view non-R4 releases, your equipment needs to be multi-zone compatible and usually also NTSC compatible.

    Robin Hood was released on DVD in Region 1 in July 2000.

    The Region 4 DVD misses out on:

    The Region 1 DVD misses out on:

   They appear even, but for my money I would favour the local release for its affordability and superior PAL image.

Summary

    Robin Hood is an entertaining family movie, but it is not up there with the Disney classics. That said, the movie still looks great for its age, and it is well presented on this DVD.

    The video quality is good for its age.

    The audio quality is also good for its age.

    The extras complement the main feature.

Ratings (out of 5)

Video
Audio
Extras
Plot
Overall

© Brandon Robert Vogt (warning: bio hazard)
Thursday, August 01, 2002
Review Equipment
DVDPioneer DV-535, using S-Video output
DisplayGrundig Elegance 82-2101 (82cm, 16x9). Calibrated with Video Essentials. This display device is 16x9 capable.
Audio DecoderBuilt in to amplifier/receiver. Calibrated with Video Essentials.
AmplificationSony STR DE-545
SpeakersSony SS-V315 x5; Sony SA-WMS315 subwoofer

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Comments (Add)
Might be open matte? - Circusfreak (read my bio) REPLY POSTED
Open Matte - Rod W (Suss out my biography if you dare)
don't want this no more - DarkEye (This bio says: Death to DNR!)
Aspect Ratio (re Open Matte), R4 "Most Wanted Edition" - and a question. -