Jaws: Revenge, The (1987)

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Released 8-Aug-2001

Cover Art

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Details At A Glance

General Extras
Category Action Theatrical Trailer
Trailer-Jaws 2; Jaws 3
Rating Rated M
Year Of Production 1987
Running Time 86:21
RSDL / Flipper RSDL (55:36) Cast & Crew
Start Up Language Select Then Menu
Region Coding 2,4 Directed By Joseph Sargent
Studio
Distributor

Universal Pictures Home Video
Starring Lorraine Gary
Lance Guest
Mario Van Peebles
Karen Young
Michael Caine
Case Amaray-Transparent
RPI $36.95 Music Michael Small


Video Audio
Pan & Scan/Full Frame None English Dolby Digital 2.0 (192Kb/s)
German Dolby Digital 2.0 (192Kb/s)
Widescreen Aspect Ratio 2.35:1
16x9 Enhancement
16x9 Enhanced
Video Format 576i (PAL)
Original Aspect Ratio 1.85:1 Miscellaneous
Jacket Pictures No
Subtitles English
German
Dutch
Swedish
Norwegian
Danish
Finnish
Smoking No
Annoying Product Placement No
Action In or After Credits No

NOTE: The Profanity Filter is ON. Turn it off here.

Plot Synopsis

    Every now and then a movie comes along which makes you wish home theatre had never been invented. Jaws: The Revenge is just such a movie. It would be prudent of me to note that in the 1988 "Razzie" awards, it blitzed home winning worst Visual Effects, and was nominated for Worst Actor, Actress, Supporting Actor, Director, Picture and last but surely not least, Worst Screenplay.

    I was not cognisant of a plot whilst watching the picture, though I do recall there being a shark which mysteriously was after the wife of Police Chief Brody and her sons - somehow it knew where they were and singled them out. I also remember incredibly poor acting by Lorraine Gary (Ellen Brody). The ending, such that it was, involved the shark exploding for no apparent reason, and the cast floating in a water tank with a sky painted on the backdrop, with water lapping upon it.

    Quite simply, it never should have been filmed, and along with the previous sequel went a long way towards dragging the whole series to the bottom of the ocean. It might have helped had the movie made more than it cost, but sadly it couldn't even manage to do that. Like they say, "We'll always have Jaws."

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Transfer Quality

Video

    Amazingly, yet true to form, this transfer is absolutely perfect, and is quite certainly reference quality in every respect. Presented in an aspect ratio of 2.35:1 and with 16x9 enhancement, this is a feast for the eyes and was the only quality which made watching it even mildly bearable. Whilst the 2.35:1 aspect is at odds with the original intent (believed to be 1.85:1), there seemed to be no framing problems, though it is unusual to have a wider aspect ratio for a transfer than the theatrical print (unless my information is incorrect).

    Stunning clarity and depth of image is on display at all times, with a sharpness and smoothness to the picture which took me quite by surprise. Distant details resolve wonderfully, and foreground images are razor sharp. Why couldn't a myriad of other, far better titles look half as good as this? There is no noise or grain of any kind, and shadow detail is very good. There is a complete absence of edge enhancement, making for a very natural and film-like appearance.

    Colours are equally stunning, with the scenes in the Bahamas being good enough to walk into. Vibrant and fully saturated, bright primary colours feature heavily, as do the more subtle shades of the green-blue water and white beaches. Amazing stuff. There is no chroma noise nor any edge bleed.

    No MPEG artefacts were observed, nor were there any film-to-video artefacts. There were some minor film artefacts throughout, consisting of small nicks to the print.

    The disc is RSDL formatted, with the layer change occurring between chapters 9 and 10 at 55:36.

Video Ratings Summary
Sharpness
Shadow Detail
Colour
Grain/Pixelization
Film-To-Video Artefacts
Film Artefacts
Overall

Audio

    There are two audio soundtracks, being both English and German in Dolby Digital 2.0 surround.

    Dialogue was always clear, though at many times seemed unnatural due to looping and the non-existent integration with the visible environment. There were no audio sync problems.

    The music was serviceable though unremarkable, borrowing heavily from the original Jaws now and then, but offering little in the way of genuine suspense. Indeed, at times the music was altogether unfitting of the action.

    Although credited on the cover as being merely stereo, the soundtrack is indeed surround encoded, with ambient noises such as rain and wind being presented nicely, along with a touch of the score. Still, the presentation was by and large upfront and centred.

    The subwoofer was left alone for most of the movie, and I think he turned himself off completely a few times out of sheer boredom. I indeed felt myself that an "off" switch would come in handy during the sitting, and was jealous of the sub.



Audio Ratings Summary
Dialogue
Audio Sync
Clicks/Pops/Dropouts
Surround Channel Use
Subwoofer
Overall

Extras

Theatrical Trailer

    Running for 59 seconds, in Dolby Digital 2.0 mono and in 1.33:1, this otherwise average trailer is distinguished by having the phrase "This time it's personal" at the end. Unbelievable.

Trailer

    Trailers for Jaws 2 and 3.

R4 vs R1

NOTE: To view non-R4 releases, your equipment needs to be multi-zone compatible and usually also NTSC compatible.

    The R1 version misses out on:

    If you do happen to like this movie, then clearly the R4 is the version of choice with 16x9 enhancement.

Summary

    Well, what is there to say. Perhaps the dullest, blandest movie yet made which never should have been. Thoroughly un-entertaining apart from the wonderful video transfer. I have given it zero for plot, since I wasn't aware of any being present. Avoid like the plague unless you are a serious fan only, or must have the complete Jaws collection.

Ratings (out of 5)

Video
Audio
Extras
Plot
Overall

© Paul Cordingley (bio)
Sunday, October 07, 2001
Review Equipment
DVDToshiba SD-900E, using RGB output
DisplayPioneer SD-T43W1 16:9 RPTV. Calibrated with Ultimate DVD Platinum. This display device is 16x9 capable.
Audio DecoderBuilt in to amplifier/receiver. Calibrated with Ultimate DVD Platinum.
AmplificationSony STR DB-930
SpeakersFront & Rears: B&W DM603 S2, Centre: B&W LCR6, Sub: B&W ASW500

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jaws 4 ratio - DarkEye (This bio says: Death to DNR!)